States Bemoan Surrender of Sovereignty to Feds

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Amidst the dark clouds hanging over the political landscape of America there is at least one ray of sunshine.  More than half the states are starting to push back against the federal government’s encroachment on their sovereignty.  The ambitious multi-trillion dollar spending plans of the Obama Administration are given as the final straw atop the out of control spending of the last two administrations.

According to World Net Daily, eight states have introduced resolutions reaffirming their sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment with another twenty states expected to follow suit this year.  These states span the geographical and political spectrum, from Main to Hawaii, and from Alaska to Arkansas.  They include heavily socialist states like California and Washington as well as relatively conservative ones like Alaska, Georgia and Alabama.

Mandates from the Feds, both funded and unfunded have placed an unsustainable burden on budgets of state and local governments.  The result has been a steady increase in taxes by those governments on their citizens.  Most states have balanced budget requirements in their constitutions and there is a dwindling supply of smokers left to tax.

According to Oklahoma State Senator Randy Brogdon, “What we are trying to do is to get the U. S. Congress out of the state’s business.”  After generations of acquiescing to federal bribery with grants and other incentives to surrender their sovereignty to the Feds in exchange for tax money pilfered from their sister states it is going to be difficult to regain their constitutional powers.  We support them in their efforts, however.

One of the greatest fears of the Founders in crafting the Constitution was the fear that future expansion of federal power would crowd out state governments resulting in one all powerful central government trampling on the liberties of the people.  A modern parallel of this fear is that of an emergence of a World Government overriding the sovereignty of individual nations.  To guard against the unwarranted growth of federal power the Tenth Amendment was added to the Constitution reinforcing the limits placed on Congressional power by Article One.

Since the passage of the Sixteenth Amendment in 1913 and the public’s passive acceptance of a progressive, targeted tax code that was neither authorized by the amendment nor sanctioned by the Constitution, the federal government has been steadily impingeing on the sovereignty of the states and the liberties of the people.  The tax code has been the number one tool of the socialist movement and the federal government to manipulate the actions of both the economy and the people over the past century.

Schemes to reform the tax code such as a consumption tax or a value added tax have fortunately not garnered enough support for passage. The only tax that meets the requirements of both the original Constitution and the Sixteenth Amendment is a flat tax rate starting with dollar one.  The acceptance of a graduated, progressive income tax coupled with tax “incentives” and targeted deductions makes social and economic engineering by the federal government the inevitable outcome.

We have long maintained that the Constitution with it enumerated powers doctrine and the requirement of equal treatment under the law—tax laws included—is the sole protector of our liberties.  The emergence of an attempt to reclaim at least some of their sovereignty by the states is step in the right direction, albeit a tiny one.  It deserves the encouragement and support of us all.

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